Darning eggs, balls, & mushrooms

darning egg elm

Darning egg made from elm. Photo by HomeThingsPast

A hundred years ago could anyone imagine that darning tools would now be unrecognisable except to antiques or crafts enthusiasts? There always used to be a steady supply of darning in the family mending bag. A woman sitting darning was a common sight, and so was a darning egg. Inside a stocking or sock with a hole in, the “egg” or darner made it easier to stitch a neat repair: not too tight, not too slack.

The simplest old darners are rounded pieces of hardwood – boxwood, maple, apple, elm – with a lovely smooth surface. Edward Pinto, the treen expert, thought the egg was the oldest shape in common use. They were also called darning balls.

sock with darning ball inside

A darning ball inside this sock makes mending easier. Photo by Lisa Dusseault.

Other names and other shapes include darning mushrooms, darners, lasts and wooden “gourds”. Real gourds or cowrie shells could be used, and special 19th century darners might be coloured glass, pottery, or ivory, or have silver handles.*

Darning mushroom

Darning mushroom. Photo by Lucia

Darning eggs that open to reveal neatly-stowed sewing accessories are attractive pieces of treen (woodware), appealing to collectors who would never actually use them. There’s something about a clever design with small things unexpectedly tucked inside a well-crafted piece of hardwood. (See pictures near the bottom of the page.) Desirable antiques now, these used to be bought as gifts. Hollow olivewood eggs with needle and thimble inside were exported to England from Southern Europe. You may also come across darners with a detachable handle doubling as a needle case.

darning mushroom

Painted darning mushroom. Photo by Emma

In France, every village woodturner had his own style of egg, as you see in this well-illustrated post, and it was once a common present for a bride. Handles were less common than in the UK or USA.

A darning-egg or ball, held in the left hand, is slipped under the hole, with the stocking stretched smoothly, but not tightly, over it.
The Dressmaker, 1916

Glove Darners

Glove darner

Wooden glove darner with two small "eggs" to put inside a finger needing mending.

Darning eggs painted wood

Classic shape for darning eggs with turned handles - plus paint. Is that a yawn at the thought of more darning? Photo by knitting iris.

When a glove needed darning, little darning eggs were pushed into the fingers. Some glove darners had different-sized balls on each end of a handle. With big sock darners, the handle itself could sometimes be used for glove repairs. Not all glove darners had a  handle. Some were simple egg shapes dropped into the finger. The handle-free type was usual in France, as with the sock darning eggs.

All these curved darners were best suited to mending small pieces of knitted clothing. They were not meant to be used for “flat darning” of  woven cloth.

*See Old-Time Tools & Toys of Needlework by Gertrude Whiting. Pinto’s Treen and other Wooden Bygones: an Encyclopaedia and Social History and Thompson’s Sewing Tools And Trinkets: Collector’s Identification & Value Guide, Vol. 2 are other sources of information.

Darning eggs with sewing kit inside

Darning egg designs from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Pincushions, needles, thimbles were often found in hollow darning eggs. The middle one also holds a glove darner, scissors, yarn, and an emery bag for polishing pins and needles.

Pictures

Photographers credited in captions. Links to originals here: striped sock, mushroom, painted mushroom, painted eggs. More picture info here

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Keri Peardon June 14, 2012 at 3:34 pm

If you want to darn gloves, but can’t find an antique darner, you can use a bodhran drumstick. While their shapes vary, most of them are the right size and have the egg-shaped end.

Of course, if you are into collecting antiques, you might want to be careful that you don’t pay a good price for an “antique glove darner” when it is, in fact, a well-used drumstick.

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lel June 14, 2012 at 4:23 pm

Good idea – they are really similar, and some of the more egg-shaped ones would be perfect as glove darners. Just a few months ago I was watching a wood turner making a bodhran drum stick but didn’t make the connection!

You’re right that collectors need to be wary. At least this little piece of wood probably wouldn’t be a very expensive mistake.

Thanks for your interesting comment.

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Rebekah August 6, 2012 at 3:45 am

Just an FYI, a bodhran ‘drumstick’ is called a beater or a tipper. :)

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Carol October 31, 2013 at 11:12 pm

I have one of these darning mushrooms

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fashion shoe decoration March 16, 2014 at 4:44 am

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